Sneakerwolf: Hungry For Japanese Culture


Source: Footpatrol

 

It is no secret that Japan is a huge player in the streetwear culture.

 

With brands like Bape, Undercover, Comme des Garcons, Undercover and Yohji Yamamoto just to name a few, the country has quite some recognizable garments worn all over the globe.

 

But don’t forget about the upcoming brands, ready to take the market by storm.

 

Sneakerwolf is someone you definitely need to keep an eye on!

 

 

 

Tokyo based artist, designer and sneakerhead Sneakerwolf has made a name for himself within the footwear industry for lending his unique artistic flair to a number of collaborations and solo projects.

 

Starting off working for Supreme being in charge of the Holiday artwork at all of Supreme’s Japanese locations in 2012, it was not until his 2016 project that got him to gain some attention in the industry.

 

 

 

Combining Japanese artistry having grown up in Japan with respect for Contemporary American artists and culture, Sneakerwolf’s brand of artistry has grown into what it is today. With artists such as Keith Haring and Robert Indiana influencing him from a young age, he managed to combine both influences alongside Japanese calligraphy and art movements.

 

Besides his own pieces, he’s also created a name for himself by collaborating with brands such Asics, where they created a Gel-Kayano inspired by the Edo period in Japanese culture. In the time, the working class was not allowed to own any luxury items, and by rocking these punk-heavy themed kicks one rebels against these higher powers.

 


Source: Highxtar

 

Another collection was the Footpatrol collection, dubbed Communi T. Footpatrol mentioned that the collection was about “honouring those who have made a genuine impact on the culture we love”, so linking up with Sneakerwolf “was a must”.

 

And Sneakerwolf in his own words on how he came up with the idea:

 

“I reimagined the Footpatrol Gasmask in a Kanji-Graphy style and went from there. Footpatrol is a famous sneaker shop, with a long history, and a lot of people know the Gasmask logo. That is why I made it because I think that it is interesting to incorporate lettering in places where you usually don’t find it.”

 


Source: Footpatrol



Source: Footpatrol

 

Checkout Sneakerwolf’s webshop for some Japanese inspired pieces that 100% boost your wardrobe.

 

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